Reply To: 9.5 Exterior Stairs vs Fire Escape

Latest News

Call for nominations for 2023 Annual Awards

OMFPOA Executive are requesting annual nominations for the following awards, please nominate deserving individuals: Jim Copeland Award Dave Sylvester Student Bursary Al Suleman Award (Fire Prevention Employee of the Year) Fire Chief of the Year Award The deadline for submissions is 26 April 2023.

Read More »

2023 Symposium Hotel Bookings

  Delta Hotels London Armouries has created a website to enable Symposium attendees to register at the discounted rate. Follow the instructions below to book . Further information on the Symposium and registration forms can be found here. Book your group rate for OMFPOA 2023 Symposium Thank you for considering to stay at the Delta

Read More »

HOME Forums Forums Fire Code & Enforcement 9.5 Exterior Stairs vs Fire Escape Reply To: 9.5 Exterior Stairs vs Fire Escape

#12651
Robert KingRobert King
Participant

Jon,

If you follow the definitions within either building or fire code for “exit”, “means of egress” and “access to exit” you should come to the conclusion that exterior stairs cannot be considered as an “exit stairway” (Exit’s are part of a means of egress which is a continuous path of travel from any point in a building).

If the fire escape (exterior stairs) is serving as a required exit then sentence 9.5.3.7. (1) applies.

Even if you wanted to look at it as an exit stairway, then Sentence 9.5.3.3.(1) would require it be protected by a 30 or 45 minute fire resistance rating depending upon building height.

I’m not sure why you refer to the building as Type 3, in Ontario we have combustible, non-combustible and heavy timber. Sounds to me like you are dealing with a combustible building. You would have to have the owner get a qualified designer to specify the fire resistance rating of the exterior wall assembly to confirm it met the 30 or 45 minute fire resistance rating, and then of course there are the requirements for protection of openings in fire separations. Likely less expensive for the owner to protect window and door openings adjacent the fire escape.

The building code doesn’t allow fire escapes to be constructed on “new buildings”, however the building code does allow exterior  stairs provided they are not a required exit, or in some cases where the dwelling unit has a second and separate means of egress.

Hope this helps.

Rob